Friday, July 17, 2015

#foxfamilyauction in the DNR

Hello Friends!

For those of you who don't receive a copy of the Daily News Record but would like to read the story from Wednesday's edition on the Fox Family Auction, please see below.

** Only 29 1/2 hours left of the auction!

With Love + Gratitude,
Sara




HARRISONBURG — An online auction raising money for one Valley family has brought at least two dozen downtown Harrisonburg businesses together.
Rhonda Fox, a special education teacher at John Wayland Elementary School, died June 23 at the age of 51 after months of battling brain seizures.
She and her husband, Kevin, both of Hinton, ran the Crazy Fox Coffee Roasting Co., a business that sold beans at the Harrisonburg Farmers Market and other locations throughout the city.
Kevin Fox said his wife first began experiencing seizures in December and was taken in for treatment at the University of Virginia Medical Center.
He said his wife had three surgeries to stop the seizures. The surgeries and hospital stays have racked up significant medical bills.
Fox said their insurance will cover some of the expenses — which he said total more than $3 million — though he said he’s not sure how much of the amount he’ll owe.
He’s paid more than $6,000 in medical bills so far, and said he expects to pay another equal amount soon.
Sara Christensen, the owner of The Lady Jane Shop in downtown Harrisonburg and a friend of the Foxes through West Side Baptist Church, created the Fox Family Auction to help them defray some of the medical costs.
Christensen said she has a sister who is chronically ill and is familiar with the burden medical expenses can place on a family.
“I thought about the downtown family I know and love, thought they would be interested in helping in some way and thought about putting together an auction,” she said.
The online auction, at www.facebook.com/foxfamilyauction,  began taking bids at 9 a.m. Saturday and will continue until 9 p.m. this upcoming Saturday.
Christensen said 26 downtown Harrisonburg businesses, nine farmers market vendors and 20 other businesses and family friends contributed a total 75 items for auction.
Interested bidders can look through photos of the items on the Facebook page and place a comment with their bids.
Once the bidding is closed, she said she will contact each of the highest bidders and arrange for a time to pick up the items from her shop at 117 S. Main St. She said people will have from July 22 to July 25 to pick up their items, and payments must be in cash.
Bidders must be 18 or older, and bids must increase in whole dollar increments, she added.
She said the items for auction — which include jewelry, art, home decor and restaurant gift certificates — are worth “well over $3,000” in retail value. Bids already have raised about $1,500, she said, and she hopes to raise at least $2,000.
Kevin Fox said he’s been “overwhelmed” with the amount of community support from the auction.
“It’s amazing,” he said. “I went and looked at all the people who gave stuff online. It’s so many people we don’t even know. It’s probably easier to go through a list of downtown merchants who aren’t involved in this.”
In addition to the auction, Troy Pearson, pastor at West Side Baptist Church in Harrisonburg, said the congregation raised nearly $9,000 for Fox’s family through a spaghetti dinner fundraiser the evening of Rhonda Fox’s funeral on June 27.
“We knew the family had incurred an amount of financial strain and wanted to support them,” he said. “You should be able to tell just from how much money was raised …  [that] Rhonda was an amazing woman, so well-respected and well-received.”
Cindy Nevin, who was friends with Rhonda Fox through the church, said she placed “a few bids” to support the Fox family.
“She was one of those people that you couldn’t deny — if you were to meet her, you would’ve loved her,” Nevin said. “If anyone needed anything, she was usually the first person to step up to the plate.”
Kevin Fox said that when his wife was at home for 10 days in April, people would bring them meals, hug her and tell her how much she meant to them.
“She told me teary-eyed, ‘I had no idea this many people loved me,’” he said. “And now I guess she would say, ‘I had no idea this many people loved my family.’”
Contact Ryan Cornell at 574-6286 or rcornell@dnronline.com

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